Archive for the ‘Introduction’ Category

Tactile Looking

02Feb13

Olin, Margaret. ‘Tactile Looking’ Touching Photographs (London: University of Chicago Press, 2012) 1-21 p.1 Photographs are visible, but photography is not only a “visual” practice. p.2 There is a tension between looking and touching; the two activities seem to alternate like a blinking eye, as though we cannot do both at the same time. Many of us […]


Introduction

10Apr12

p.1 Landscape is a social product; particular landscapes tell us something about cultural histories and attitudes. landscape results from human intervention to shape or transform natural phenomena, of which we are simultaneously a part. p.3 The act of naming is an act of taming. From its inception photography has been involved in investigating and detailing […]


Schwartz, Joan M; Ryan, James R. ‘Photography and the Geographical Imagination’ Picturing Place: Photography and the Geographical Imagination ed. by Joan M. Schwartz and James R. Ryan (London: I.B.Taurus, 2003) 1-18 p.1 More than one hundred and fifty years later – despite ongoing and unresolved debates over the status of photography as a fine art and over […]


Price, Mary. The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 1-21 p.1 This is a book with two major emphases. The first is that the language of description is deeply implicated in how a viewer looks at photographs. Description may be title, caption, or text. The more detailed the description, the more […]


Patricia Holland, pp.1-14: Holland, Patricia., Spence, Jo., eds. Family snaps: the meanings of domestic photography (London: Virago, 1991) p.2 Unlike the social historian, the owner of an album does not look for the ‘truth’ of the past. Instead, we give it our own recognition, just as, when we make a picture, we commit our present […]


‘Photographs as Objects’ Elizabeth Edwards and Janice Hart in Photographs Objects Histories: On the Materiality of Images, edited by Elizabeth Edwards and Janice Hart, Routledge, London, 2004. 1-15 p.1 [Edwards and Hart note that in Camera Lucida what Barthes] describes first is not the image of two children but a material object. It is a […]