Archive for the ‘Journals’ Category

McInnes, Marnie. ‘A Meditation on Poetry and Photography’ Photographies, 5:1 (March 2012) 19-32 p.19 In 26 lines describing a fairly ordinary landscape, Atwood encapsulates key paradoxes of photography as a medium; indeed, one way of reading her poem is as a compact essay on the ontology of the photographic image. As a poem, however it […]


Kember, Sarah J. ‘The Virtual Life of Photography’, Photographies, 1:2, 2008, pp.175 – 203 After more than 150 years, we still do not know what photography is. The reason for this, I suggest, is indeed due to the deployment of a restricted range of disciplinary and conceptual frameworks – but only in part. Memory constitutes […]


Kotz, Liz. ‘Language Between Performance and Photography’ October. Winter 2005, Issue 111, 3-21. p.3 Although there is a tendency to see language as something like the “signature style” of Conceptual work, it is important to remember that the turn to language as an artistic material occurs earlier, with the profusion of text-based scores, instructions, and performance notations that […]


Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Photogrammatology: Writing/Photography’ Art Document, Winter (1994), 3-6 p.3 By projecting photography as a system of representation, each individual photograph becomes an historical, and therefore mutable, artefact of meaning. This view of photography directly opposes  the one propagated since the late 1960’s by formalist scholars, such as John Szarkowski. This Kantian historiography therefore entails a continual search for “concepts […]


Flusser, Vilem. ‘The Photograph as Post-Industrial Object: An Essay on the Ontological Standing of Photographs’ Leonardo, 19:4, 329-332, 1986 p.329 The Latin term ‘objectum’ and its Greek equivalent ‘problema’ mean ‘thrown against’, which implies that there is something against which the object is thrown: a ‘subject’. As subjects, we face a universe of objects, of problems, […]


Damisch, Hubert. ‘Five Notes for a Phenomenology of the Photographic Image’ October, 5, Summer 1978, 70-72 p.70 Theoretically speaking, photography is nothing other than a process of recording, a technique of inscribing, in an emulsion of silver salts, a stable image generated by a ray of light.This definition, we note, neither assumes the use of a camera, […]


Dahlgren, Anna. ‘Dated Photographs: The Personal Photo Album as Visual and Textual Medium’, Photography & Culture, 3:2, 175-194 p.176 Unlike personal photo albums made after 1900, text is scarce in general in personal carte-de-visite albums and, especially, indications of when the images were taken are very rare. This characteristic seems to suggest a different view of […]


Takvan, Monica. ‘Perception and Knowledge – In Connection to the Eye and the Senses’, Photography & Culture, 3:3, 321-330 Research in Progress p.321 Perception is often connected to knowledge and information gained through the eyes, and when saying we understand something, the term “I see” is often used. Is seeing the equivalent of understanding? And is perceiving the same as […]


Buse, Peter. ‘Surely Fades Away’, Photographies, 1:2, 221 – 238 [discussion of Robert Adams & Polaroid] However, far from being some sort of special case or exception to the rule, Polaroid’s relationship with Adams simply crystallizes a problematic of value that runs right through the history of instant photography: its simultaneous association with both high […]


Palmer, Daniel. ‘Emotional Archives: Online Photo Sharing and the Cultivation of the Self’, Photographies, 3:2, 155 – 171 The nature of these digital snapshots has already attracted considerable attention. For instance, there is widespread agreement among researchers that such images are both more intimate and mundane than earlier forms of personal photography (Gye; Murray). Indeed, […]


Snapshots

03Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Snapshots’, Photographies, 1:2, 121 – 142, 2008. […] it could be said that snapshots are to the history of photography as photography is to the history of art; each represents a significant threat to the stability of its host discipline. [Batchen describes three vernacular photographs] It’s been said that Americans alone take about […]


In this interview with Joachim Schmid by Lens Culture, he suggests that he remembers events and places he has travelled, through the photographs he finds in those places. The project has a personal level as well […] its also my personal diary, I usually travel without a camera… so I don’t take any travel snapshots. When […]


The Family Gaze

17Feb11

Haldrop, Michael; Larsen, Jonas. ‘The Family Gaze’ Tourist Studies 3 (London: Sage Publications, 2003) pp.23-46 p.24 Despite the fact that taking photographs is perhaps the emblematic tourist practice and that tourist studies have been dominated by a visual paradigm of gazing, remarkably little sustained research has explored the general connections between tourism and popular tourist […]


Dzenko, Corey. ‘Analog to Digital: the indexical function of photographic images’ Afterimage vol.37 no.3 (Sep-Oct 2009) 19-23 p.19 [Conpares to Marshall McLuhan’s description of railway] […] digital photography “accelerates” or “enlarges” traditional photographic processes. Digital photography challenges the historical belief that photography is representative of reality. But have viewers’ perceptions shifted in relation to theoretical […]


pp.3-6 in: Bate, David. ‘The Archaeology of Photography: Rereading Michel Foucault and The Archaeology of Knowledge’. Afterimage. vol.35 no.3 (Sept-Oct 2007) p.3 For Foucault, the historian must excavate an archive to reveal not merely what is in it, but the very conditions that have made that archive possible, what he calls its historical a priori. In […]


Volpe, Andrea L., ‘Archival Meaning: Materiality, Digitization, and the Nineteenth-century Photograph’ AfterImage, 36 no.6 May/June 2009. 11-14 p.11 By focusing on the photograph as object and the terms on which digitization is changing access to photographs as archival objects, these exhibits prompt a rethinking of the history of nineteenth-century photography as a history of what […]


Rice, Shelley., ‘Archive Fever & Barbara Bloom’, Aperture, 192 (Fall 2008), 10-11 p.10 [Rice asks] ‘Why the current fetish for archives?’ [Rice] ‘began to see what our new digital, archival practice is: a never-ending stream of information, rarely coalescing into meaning.’ ‘Why has archive fever resurfaced today? Perhaps because globalization, economic and political changes, new […]


Ulrich Baer ‘Deep in the Archive’, Aperture, 193 (Winter 2008), 54–59 p.54 ‘In the silence of the archive, researchers try and grasp the texture of lives from the remains left here, on this sheet, in this box, on this clean table, and now for their eyes only.’ ‘By definition, archives always collect a bit too […]


Andy Grundberg ‘The Art of the American Snapshot’, Aperture, 190 (Spring 2008), 10–11 [On snapshots:] ‘Once ripped from their family-album contexts they are on the whole anonymous, banal, repetitive, trite.’ ‘So much for progressivism: the snapshot was born beautiful […] only to grow into a hyperactive but physically unremarkable adulthood. Perhaps it was the mass-media’s […]


David Levi Strauss ‘Click here to disappear: Some thoughts on Images and Democracy’, Aperture, 190 (Spring 2008), 20 ‘To regain our liberty (and our distance), we must slow the images down.’ ‘Images online are both more ephemeral (in form) and substantial (in number) than ever. We spend more time collecting and sorting images, but less […]