Archive for the ‘Ambiguity and Photography’ Category

Fontcuberta, Joan. Landscapes without Memory (New York: Aperture Foundation, 2005) 4-7 Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Photography by the Numbers’ Landscapes without Memory (New York: Aperture Foundation, 2005) 9-13 p.9 [referring to Joan Fontcuberta new landscape images and the first pictures sent from the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon] Worlds apart, the two pictures nevertheless share a common conceptual infrastructure. […]


Price, Mary. ‘Mask as Descriptive Concept’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 117-133 p.117 […] what Barthes and other writers have done is to bring within the range of possibility an acknowledgment on the part of the rest of us that what they have discovered and named must exist for […]


Price, Mary. ‘The End, Secular Aura’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 173-177 p.173 Each of the metaphors used, whether the term is aura, mask, or language, illuminates the idea of the photograph. Benjamin, Proust, Musil, and Barthes, as well as Keats with his negative capability, are all saying, in individual poetic […]


Metaphor

05Dec11

Price, Mary. ‘Metaphor’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 134-149 pp.134-135 Before photography, according to Ivins [William M, Ivins, Jr.], the syntactical analysis of a picture preceded the handmade reproduction, which became a symbolic representation of its original. references for reproduction are the woodcut, etching, or lithograph that reproduce a […]


Lomax, Yve. ‘The photograph and les temps‘ Writing the Image (London: I.B.Tauris, 2000) 121-134 p.121 A body can be anything – an animal, an idea, a body of sounds, a mountain, a liguistic corpus, a child, a photographic body of images or a wind. A body, we might say, is never separable from its relations with the […]


The Image

27Sep11

Flusser, Vilém. “Image” pp.8-13 in Towards a Philosophy of Photography (London: Reaktion Books, 2005) p.8 Images signify – mainly – something ‘out there’ in space and time that they have to make comprehensible to us as abstractions (as reductions of the four dimensions of space and time to the two surface dimensions). This specific ability […]


Sontag, Susan. ‘In Plato’s Cave’ On Photography (London: Penguin Books, 1979) 3-24 p.3 In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally the most grandiose […]


Anne Hardy

10Apr10

Text from http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/anne_hardy.htm Strange, fantastical, and a wee bit unsettling, Anne Hardy’s photographs invite glimpses into imaginary places, each suggesting fictions of a very surreal nature. Working in her studio, Hardy builds each of her sets entirely from scratch; a labour intensive process of constructing a barren room, then developing its elaborate interior down to […]


Stories

04Apr10

Berger, John. ‘Stories’ Another Way of Telling by John Berger and Jean Mohr (Cambridge: Granta Books, 1982) 277-289 p.280 A photograph is simpler than most memories, its range more limited. Yet with the invention of photography we acquired a new means of expression more closely associated with memory than any other. Both the photograph and the […]


June Clark

21Feb10

Amazing work using and manipulating found photographs. “June was born and brought up in Harlem, New York City. She emigrated to Canada in 1968, became a Canadian citizen and currently lives and works in Toronto.” Date made: 1989 Materials: photo etching (with text) Text reads: Grandma said, “when you pick your husband, think of what […]


Appearances

26Nov09

Bergere, John. ‘Appearances’ Another Way of Telling (New York: Vintage Books, 1982) 81- p.86 A photograph arrests the flow of time in which the event photographed once existed. All photographs are off the past, yet in them an instant of the past is arrested so that, unlike a lived past, it can never lead to […]



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