Archive for the ‘Analogue – Digital’ Category

Kember, Sarah; Zylinska, Joanna. ‘Remediating Creativity: Performance, Invention, Critique’, Life After New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process (Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2012) pp.173-200 p.175 In the context of the previous arguments, it may seem risky or even impudent to reclaim creativity as a viable strategy for thinking about the media differently. p.176 Indeed, creativity is inevitably tied […]


Kember, Sarah J. ‘The Virtual Life of Photography’, Photographies, 1:2, 2008, pp.175 – 203 After more than 150 years, we still do not know what photography is. The reason for this, I suggest, is indeed due to the deployment of a restricted range of disciplinary and conceptual frameworks – but only in part. Memory constitutes […]


Savedoff, Barbara E. ‘Transforming Media: Painting, Photography and Digital Imagery’ Transforming Images: How Photography Complicates the Picture (New York: Cornell University Press, 2000) 185-209 p.185-186 [on painting and photography] the relations between these two media have undergone important changes, from the time of photography’s first struggle to define itself against painting, to the present time, when with […]


Poetry

15Dec12

Flusser, Vilem. ‘Poetry’ Does Writing have a Future? translated by Nancy Ann Roth (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2011) 71-75 p.71 A distinction is traditionally made between poetry and mimicry (poesis and mimesis). But under the sway of the alphabet, this close connection between thinking and language – poetry – is usually understood as a language game whose […]


Flusser, Vilem. ‘Spoken Languages’ Does Writing have a Future? trans. by Nancy Ann Roth (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2011) 63-69 p.63 When programming has set itself free of alphanumeric writing, thought will no longer need to work through a spoken language to become visible. Thought and speech will no longer be fused, as they were […]


Flusser, Vilém. ‘The Gesture of Writing’ 1991 Accessible online here. p.1 To write means, of course, to perform an action by which a material, (for instance chalk, or ink), is put on a surface, (for instance a blackboard or a leaf of paper), to form a specific pattern, (for instance letters). And the tools used […]



Savedoff, Barbara E. ‘Transformation in Photography’ Transforming Images: How Photography Complicates the Picture (New York: Cornell University Press, 2000) 47-128 p.48 Photography’s special significance lies in its documentary quality, in the fact that the photographer does not have the painter’s freedom to create and control. But if this is true, we can only evaluate photographs […]


Flusser, Vilem. ‘The Photograph as Post-Industrial Object: An Essay on the Ontological Standing of Photographs’ Leonardo, 19:4, 329-332, 1986 p.329 The Latin term ‘objectum’ and its Greek equivalent ‘problema’ mean ‘thrown against’, which implies that there is something against which the object is thrown: a ‘subject’. As subjects, we face a universe of objects, of problems, […]


McCauley, Anne. ‘Overexposure: Thoughts on the Triumph of Photography’, The Meaning of Photography ed. by Robin Kelsey and Blake Stimson (Williamstown, MA: Sterling and Francine Clark Institute, 2005) 159-162 p.159 [discusses photography’s acceptance into art institutions] p.160 Museums became infotainment for people who wanted to walk rather than sit in front of screens when escaping from their […]


Buse, Peter. ‘Surely Fades Away’, Photographies, 1:2, 221 – 238 [discussion of Robert Adams & Polaroid] However, far from being some sort of special case or exception to the rule, Polaroid’s relationship with Adams simply crystallizes a problematic of value that runs right through the history of instant photography: its simultaneous association with both high […]


Palmer, Daniel. ‘Emotional Archives: Online Photo Sharing and the Cultivation of the Self’, Photographies, 3:2, 155 – 171 The nature of these digital snapshots has already attracted considerable attention. For instance, there is widespread agreement among researchers that such images are both more intimate and mundane than earlier forms of personal photography (Gye; Murray). Indeed, […]


Mitchell, William J. ‘Wunderkammer to World Wide Web: Picturing Place in the Post-photographic Era’ Picturing Place: Photography and the Geographical Imagination ed. by Joan M. Schwartz and James R. Ryan (London: I.B.Taurus, 2003) 283-304 p.283 For as long as history records, societies have formed their knowledge of past times and distant places by capturing, transporting and displaying evidence […]


Elkins, James. ‘Selenite, Ice, Salt’ What Photography Is (Oxon: Routledge, 2011) 15-44   p.17 [On a photograph Elkins finds of a selenite window] Seen through the window, the world would look like ill-fitted pieces of mosaic crushed together, pressed and refracted by the translucent material into a nearly indecipherable pattern. The window’s inclusions, its grit and spalling […]


Fontcuberta, Joan. Landscapes without Memory (New York: Aperture Foundation, 2005) 4-7 Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Photography by the Numbers’ Landscapes without Memory (New York: Aperture Foundation, 2005) 9-13 p.9 [referring to Joan Fontcuberta new landscape images and the first pictures sent from the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon] Worlds apart, the two pictures nevertheless share a common conceptual infrastructure. […]


Ectoplasm

31Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Ectoplasm’ Each wild idea: writing, photography, history (Cambridge, Mass.; London: MIT, 2002 [essay originally published in 1994]) 128-144 p.129 This [current] sustained outburst of morbidity appears to stem from two related anxieties. The first is an effect of the widespread introduction of computer-driven imaging processes that allow “fake” photos to be passed off […]


Mayer-Schonberger, Viktor. ‘The Role of Remembering and the Importance of Forgetting’ Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age (Princeton, Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009) 16-49 p.17 Contrary to popular belief that we only use a small fraction of our brain’s power, the entire network of neurons and synapses is active in healthy human beings. But […]


Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor. ‘Failing to forget the “Drunken Pirate”‘ Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age (Princeton, Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009) 1-15 p.11 What we sense is the demise of forgetting, and a fundamental shift to the default of remembering. [discussion of Panopticon, ‘a prison in which guards could watch prisoners without prisoners knowing whether […]


Snapshots

03Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Snapshots’, Photographies, 1:2, 121 – 142, 2008. […] it could be said that snapshots are to the history of photography as photography is to the history of art; each represents a significant threat to the stability of its host discipline. [Batchen describes three vernacular photographs] It’s been said that Americans alone take about […]


Flusser, Vilém. “The Distribution of Photographs” pp.49-56 in Towards a Philosophy of Photography (London: Reaktion Books, 2005) p.49 Nature as a whole is a system in which information disintegrates progressively according to the second law of thermodynamics. Human beings struggle against this natural entropy not only by receiving information but also storing and passing it on – […]