Archive for the ‘Familial relations & Photography’ Category

Jean-Claude Gautrand, Publicités Kodak: 1910-1939 (Paris: Contre-jour, 1983). p.2 The advertised image is no less ephemeral than the newspaper, the magazine or the poster that conveys it. The need to continually  repeat the commercial message, to reassess its visual impact and to avoid visual boredom leads to making a series of images that follow one another, […]


Palmer, Daniel. ‘Emotional Archives: Online Photo Sharing and the Cultivation of the Self’, Photographies, 3:2, 155 – 171 The nature of these digital snapshots has already attracted considerable attention. For instance, there is widespread agreement among researchers that such images are both more intimate and mundane than earlier forms of personal photography (Gye; Murray). Indeed, […]


Langford, Martha. ‘Speaking the Album: An Application of the Oral-Photographic Framework’ Locating Memory: Photographic Acts ed. by Annette Kuhn and Kirsten Emiko McAllister (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2006) 223-246 p.223 […] attention to the photographic album since the mid-1960s can be said to constitute in itself a model ‘thought community’, an idea of album sustained by […]


Snapshots

03Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Snapshots’, Photographies, 1:2, 121 – 142, 2008. […] it could be said that snapshots are to the history of photography as photography is to the history of art; each represents a significant threat to the stability of its host discipline. [Batchen describes three vernacular photographs] It’s been said that Americans alone take about […]


Price, Mary. ‘Proust, Lowell, Barthes, Musil’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 150-172 p.150 Benjamin’s touchstone is Proust, the first great imaginative writer to make extensive use of the wonder and the magic of photography. pp.151-157 [discussion and analysis of Proust’s grandmother’s transformation] p.154 Proust’s metaphor suggests that the photograph […]


Smith, Shawn Michelle. ‘Race and Reproduction in Camera Lucida’ Photography:Theoretical Snapshots ed. by Long, J.J., Nobel, Andrea, and Welch, Edward (Oxon: Routledge, 2009) pp.98-111 p.98 A close reading of [Camera Lucida] discovers that many of Barthes’s most important and influential insights are informed by complicated, and sometimes vexing, personal-political inclinations. Indeed, Barthes’s very conception of photography is […]


The Family Gaze

17Feb11

Haldrop, Michael; Larsen, Jonas. ‘The Family Gaze’ Tourist Studies 3 (London: Sage Publications, 2003) pp.23-46 p.24 Despite the fact that taking photographs is perhaps the emblematic tourist practice and that tourist studies have been dominated by a visual paradigm of gazing, remarkably little sustained research has explored the general connections between tourism and popular tourist […]


Prosser, Jay. “Buddha Barthes: What Barthes Saw in Photography ( That He Didn’t in Literature)” pp.91-103 in Photography Degree Zero ed. by Geoffrey Batchen (London: The MIT Press, 2009) p.91 Roland Barthes’s last book is on photography and it is about the limit of words. Beginning with the dropped out words of one Buddhist lama recalled […]


C o l l e c t e d V i s i o n s was conceived by Lorie Novak and created in collaboration with Clilly Castiglia, Betsey Kershaw, and Kerry O’Neill. Launched in May 1996, Collected Visions is a participatory website that explores the relationship between family photographs and memory. The most significant […]


Empty rooms are filled with “projections” replaying psychological and emotional events. http://lorienovak.com/


June Clark

21Feb10

Amazing work using and manipulating found photographs. “June was born and brought up in Harlem, New York City. She emigrated to Canada in 1968, became a Canadian citizen and currently lives and works in Toronto.” Date made: 1989 Materials: photo etching (with text) Text reads: Grandma said, “when you pick your husband, think of what […]


One of my favourite works. It tells us more about photography than seeing ‘the photograph’ ever could. Buy the book here: http://www.cornerhouse.org/books/info.aspx?ID=745&page=0 I have scanned the images myself so hopefully this won’t have any copyright issues – but I want more people to be able to see this work!


Patricia Holland, pp.1-14: Holland, Patricia., Spence, Jo., eds. Family snaps: the meanings of domestic photography (London: Virago, 1991) p.2 Unlike the social historian, the owner of an album does not look for the ‘truth’ of the past. Instead, we give it our own recognition, just as, when we make a picture, we commit our present […]


p.3 Barthes ‘wanted to learn at all costs what Photography was “in itself,” by what essential feature it was to be distinguished from the community of images. p.4 What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once: the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentially. p.5 The Photograph is never anything but […]


Slater, Don. ‘Domestic Photography and Digital Culture’ The Photographic Image in Digital Culture ed. by Martin Lister (London: Routledge, 1995) 129-146 p.130 The photographic image in the everyday of digital culture takes its shape and force within [the] mélange of domesticity, consumerism and leisure. p.131 In sum, what is important in the development of domestic photography is […]


Kuhn, Annette., Family secrets: acts of memory and imagination (London: Verso, 2002) p.154 It is but the shortest step from this to acknowledging that photographs may ‘speak’ silence, absence, and contradiction as much as, indeed more than, presence, truth or authenticity; and that while in the production of memory photographs might often repress this knowledge, they […]


Hirsch, Marianne., Family Frames: Photography, Narrative and Postmemory (London: Harvard University Press, 1997) p.2 Barthes cannot show us the photograph because we stand outside the familial network of looks and thus cannot see the picture in the way that Barthes must. To us it would be just another generic family photograph. The picture of his […]