Archive for the ‘Melancholy/Death & Photography’ Category

Van Lier, Henri. Philosophy of Photography, Lieven Gevaert Series, 6, New ed. (Leuven: Univ. Press, 2007) ‘Part Three: Photographic Behaviours’, pp.77-78 p.77 As with all other techniques, photography poses the question of the nature of the link between equipment and human activity in general. The humanist illusion suggests that equipment is a means in the service […]


McInnes, Marnie. ‘A Meditation on Poetry and Photography’ Photographies, 5:1 (March 2012) 19-32 p.19 In 26 lines describing a fairly ordinary landscape, Atwood encapsulates key paradoxes of photography as a medium; indeed, one way of reading her poem is as a compact essay on the ontology of the photographic image. As a poem, however it […]


Judgement Day

10Jan13

Agamben, Giorgio. ‘Judgement Day’ Profanations translated by Jeff Fort (New York: Zone Books, 2010) 23-27 p.23 What quality fascinates and entrances me in the photographs I love? I believe it is this: for me, photography in some way captures the Last Judgement; it represents the world as it appears on the last day. the Day […]


Ectoplasm

31Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Ectoplasm’ Each wild idea: writing, photography, history (Cambridge, Mass.; London: MIT, 2002 [essay originally published in 1994]) 128-144 p.129 This [current] sustained outburst of morbidity appears to stem from two related anxieties. The first is an effect of the widespread introduction of computer-driven imaging processes that allow “fake” photos to be passed off […]


Eternal Return

14Nov11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Eternal Return’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 31-44 p.31 There can be no passing moment that is not already both the past and the future: the moment must be simultaneously past, present, and future in order for it to pass at all. p.32 The […]


Stars

13Nov11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Stars’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 26-30 p.26 Benjamin not only associates stars with a photographic language that focuses on the relations between light and darkness, past and present, life and death, reading and writing, and knowledge and representation – motifs that all belong to the […]


Lightning

13Nov11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Lightning’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 21-26 p.21 Linked to the flashes of memory, the suddenness of the perception of similarity, the irruption of events or images, and even the passage into night, Benjamin’s vocabulary of lightning helps register what comes to pass in the opening […]


Translations

12Nov11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Translations’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 15-18 p.15 The disjunction between a photograph and the photographed corresponds to the caesura between a translation and an original. […] in order to be faithful to what is translatable in the original, the translator must depart from it, must […]


Friday, Jonathan. ‘Stillness Becoming: Reflections on Bazin, Barthes and Photographic Stillness’ Stillness and Time: Photography and the Moving Image ed. by David Green and Joanna Lowry (Brighton: Photoforum; Photoworks, 2006) 39-54 p.39 Long before the invention of cinema, for example, photography was associated with stillness in a way that other pictorial media were not. The […]


Ghosts

18Oct11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Ghosts’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 11-13 p.11 Like an angel of history whose wings register the traces of this disappearance, the image bears witness to an experience that cannot come to light. Although what the photograph photographs is no longer present or living, […]


Mortification

18Oct11

Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Mortification’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 7-11 p.7 The incunabula of photography – its beginnings, its childhood, but also its burial place, its funereal plot its relation to printing and inscription flashes the truth of the photo. This truth says, if it can say […]


Sontag, Susan. ‘In Plato’s Cave’ On Photography (London: Penguin Books, 1979) 3-24 p.3 In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally the most grandiose […]


Prosser, Jay. “Buddha Barthes: What Barthes Saw in Photography ( That He Didn’t in Literature)” pp.91-103 in Photography Degree Zero ed. by Geoffrey Batchen (London: The MIT Press, 2009) p.91 Roland Barthes’s last book is on photography and it is about the limit of words. Beginning with the dropped out words of one Buddhist lama recalled […]


p.3 Barthes ‘wanted to learn at all costs what Photography was “in itself,” by what essential feature it was to be distinguished from the community of images. p.4 What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once: the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentially. p.5 The Photograph is never anything but […]


Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History 221-244 in Petro, Patrice. ed., Fugitive images, from photography to video (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996) p.221 […] Benjamin persistently conceives of history in the language of photography, as though he wished to offer us a series of snapshots of his latest reflections on history. What […]


Batchen, Geoffrey., ‘’fearful ghost of former bloom’: What Photography Is’ Where is the Photograph ed. by David Green (Brighton, Kent: Photoforum, Photoworks, 2003) 15-29 [Batchen discovers a large 19th century photo-object combining hair, waxen flowers, wreath, words and a photograph] p.19 Memory is here given a physical manifestation. Or perhaps it would be more accurate […]


Ulrich Baer ‘Deep in the Archive’, Aperture, 193 (Winter 2008), 54–59 p.54 ‘In the silence of the archive, researchers try and grasp the texture of lives from the remains left here, on this sheet, in this box, on this clean table, and now for their eyes only.’ ‘By definition, archives always collect a bit too […]


“Will Image Move Us Still” by Kevin Robins, pp.29-50. The Photographic Image in Digital Culture, edited by Martin Lister, London, Routledge, 1995. p.30 The fact that technological development is seen as some kind of transcendent and autonomous force – rather than what it really is, that is to say embedded in a whole array of […]