Archive for the ‘Memory Objects’ Category

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Ere the Substance Fade: Photography and hair jewellery’ Photographs Objects Histories: On the materiality of images ed. by Elizabeth Edwards and Janice Hart (London: Routledge, 2004) 32-46 p.32 [On a photo-locket] Designed to be touched, this object touches back, casually grazing the pores of my skin with its textured surfaces. In this mutual […]


Mayer-Schonberger, Viktor. ‘The Role of Remembering and the Importance of Forgetting’ Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age (Princeton, Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009) 16-49 p.17 Contrary to popular belief that we only use a small fraction of our brain’s power, the entire network of neurons and synapses is active in healthy human beings. But […]


Langford, Martha. ‘Speaking the Album: An Application of the Oral-Photographic Framework’ Locating Memory: Photographic Acts ed. by Annette Kuhn and Kirsten Emiko McAllister (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2006) 223-246 p.223 […] attention to the photographic album since the mid-1960s can be said to constitute in itself a model ‘thought community’, an idea of album sustained by […]


Snapshots

03Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Snapshots’, Photographies, 1:2, 121 – 142, 2008. […] it could be said that snapshots are to the history of photography as photography is to the history of art; each represents a significant threat to the stability of its host discipline. [Batchen describes three vernacular photographs] It’s been said that Americans alone take about […]


View video here: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/jonathan_harris_collects_stories.html At the EG conference in December 2007, artist Jonathan Harris discusses his latest projects, which involve collecting stories: his own, strangers’, and stories collected from the Internet, including his amazing “We Feel Fine.” Brooklyn-based artist Jonathan Harris‘ work celebrates the world’s diversity even as it illustrates the universal concerns of its occupants. […]


Anne Hardy

10Apr10

Text from http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/anne_hardy.htm Strange, fantastical, and a wee bit unsettling, Anne Hardy’s photographs invite glimpses into imaginary places, each suggesting fictions of a very surreal nature. Working in her studio, Hardy builds each of her sets entirely from scratch; a labour intensive process of constructing a barren room, then developing its elaborate interior down to […]



June Clark

21Feb10

Amazing work using and manipulating found photographs. “June was born and brought up in Harlem, New York City. She emigrated to Canada in 1968, became a Canadian citizen and currently lives and works in Toronto.” Date made: 1989 Materials: photo etching (with text) Text reads: Grandma said, “when you pick your husband, think of what […]


Julian Walker

26Jan10

From his website: http://walkerjulian.tripod.com/id34.html Most of my work is site-specific; where it is not, it is strongly referencing an idea or set of ideas. In this sense it is reactive, exploring how I can understand specific bits of the world, or exploring how other people have done so. Hence my interest in museums, collections and […]


Stewart, Susan. ‘Objects of Desire’ in On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection (Durham; London: Duke University Press, 1993) pp.132-169 Part II. The Collection, Paradise of Consumption pp.151-169 p.151 In contrast to the souvenir, the collection offers example rather than sample, metaphor rather than metonymy.  The collection replaces history with […]


Edwards, Elizabeth. ‘Photographs as Objects of Memory’ Material Memories ed. by Marius Kwint, Christopher Breward, Jeremy Aynsley, (Oxford: Berg, 1999) 221-236 p.222 [Edwards shall] shift the methodological focus away from content alone, arguing that it is not merely the image qua image that is the focus of contemplation, evocation and memory, but that its material […]


p.3 Barthes ‘wanted to learn at all costs what Photography was “in itself,” by what essential feature it was to be distinguished from the community of images. p.4 What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once: the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentially. p.5 The Photograph is never anything but […]


Slater, Don. ‘Domestic Photography and Digital Culture’ The Photographic Image in Digital Culture ed. by Martin Lister (London: Routledge, 1995) 129-146 p.130 The photographic image in the everyday of digital culture takes its shape and force within [the] mélange of domesticity, consumerism and leisure. p.131 In sum, what is important in the development of domestic photography is […]


Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Vernacular Photographies’ Each wild idea: writing, photography, history (Cambridge, Mass.; London: MIT, 2002) 56-80 p.57 [Batchen describes] what has always been excluded from photography’s history: ordinary photographs  […] the photographs that preoccupy the home and the heart but rarely the museum or the academy. [Batchen describes reasons why vernacular photographs were written out of […]


Labyrinth (My Mother’s Album) is a large-scale installation consisting of a series of narrow corridors leading in a maze-like double spiral. The viewer enters the installation through a door and is lead through progressively shorter corridors at right angles until he or she enters a small space in the centre of the labyrinth. This room, […]


Batchen, Geoffrey., ‘’fearful ghost of former bloom’: What Photography Is’ Where is the Photograph ed. by David Green (Brighton, Kent: Photoforum, Photoworks, 2003) 15-29 [Batchen discovers a large 19th century photo-object combining hair, waxen flowers, wreath, words and a photograph] p.19 Memory is here given a physical manifestation. Or perhaps it would be more accurate […]


“The Medium is the Memory” pp134-149, by Florian Brody, in The Digital Dialectic, edited by Peter Lunenfeld, published by The MIT Press, London, 2000.  p.136 […] the book has the quality of captured memory […] the book is a personal item, an extension of an individual’s memory. p.138 The homepage is […] the ultimate form […]