Archive for the ‘Identification & Photography’ Category

Sekula, Allan. ‘On the Invention of Photographic Meaning’ Thinking Photography ed. by Victor Burgin (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 1982) 84-109 p.84 The meaning of a photograph, like that of any other entity, in inevitably subject to cultural definition. The task here is to define and engage critically something we might call the ‘photographic discourse’. A discourse is defined […]


McInnes, Marnie. ‘A Meditation on Poetry and Photography’ Photographies, 5:1 (March 2012) 19-32 p.19 In 26 lines describing a fairly ordinary landscape, Atwood encapsulates key paradoxes of photography as a medium; indeed, one way of reading her poem is as a compact essay on the ontology of the photographic image. As a poem, however it […]


Langford, Martha. ‘Speaking the Album: An Application of the Oral-Photographic Framework’ Locating Memory: Photographic Acts ed. by Annette Kuhn and Kirsten Emiko McAllister (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2006) 223-246 p.223 […] attention to the photographic album since the mid-1960s can be said to constitute in itself a model ‘thought community’, an idea of album sustained by […]


Snapshots

03Jan12

Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Snapshots’, Photographies, 1:2, 121 – 142, 2008. […] it could be said that snapshots are to the history of photography as photography is to the history of art; each represents a significant threat to the stability of its host discipline. [Batchen describes three vernacular photographs] It’s been said that Americans alone take about […]


Price, Mary. ‘The End, Secular Aura’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 173-177 p.173 Each of the metaphors used, whether the term is aura, mask, or language, illuminates the idea of the photograph. Benjamin, Proust, Musil, and Barthes, as well as Keats with his negative capability, are all saying, in individual poetic […]


Price, Mary. ‘Proust, Lowell, Barthes, Musil’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 150-172 p.150 Benjamin’s touchstone is Proust, the first great imaginative writer to make extensive use of the wonder and the magic of photography. pp.151-157 [discussion and analysis of Proust’s grandmother’s transformation] p.154 Proust’s metaphor suggests that the photograph […]


Smith, Shawn Michelle. ‘Race and Reproduction in Camera Lucida’ Photography:Theoretical Snapshots ed. by Long, J.J., Nobel, Andrea, and Welch, Edward (Oxon: Routledge, 2009) pp.98-111 p.98 A close reading of [Camera Lucida] discovers that many of Barthes’s most important and influential insights are informed by complicated, and sometimes vexing, personal-political inclinations. Indeed, Barthes’s very conception of photography is […]


Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Dreams of Ordinary Life: Cartes-de-visite and the bourgeois imagination’ Photography: Theoretical Snapshots (Oxon: Routledge, 2009) p.80-97 p.80 […] the search for imagination in the carte-de-visite must be directed elsewhere, away from the usual focus on photographer and subject, and instead onto the minds eye of their viewers.[?] p.82 Compared to earlier processes such as the daguerrotype, […]


Stories

04Apr10

Berger, John. ‘Stories’ Another Way of Telling by John Berger and Jean Mohr (Cambridge: Granta Books, 1982) 277-289 p.280 A photograph is simpler than most memories, its range more limited. Yet with the invention of photography we acquired a new means of expression more closely associated with memory than any other. Both the photograph and the […]


Empty rooms are filled with “projections” replaying psychological and emotional events. http://lorienovak.com/


June Clark

21Feb10

Amazing work using and manipulating found photographs. “June was born and brought up in Harlem, New York City. She emigrated to Canada in 1968, became a Canadian citizen and currently lives and works in Toronto.” Date made: 1989 Materials: photo etching (with text) Text reads: Grandma said, “when you pick your husband, think of what […]


p.3 Barthes ‘wanted to learn at all costs what Photography was “in itself,” by what essential feature it was to be distinguished from the community of images. p.4 What the Photograph reproduces to infinity has occurred only once: the Photograph mechanically repeats what could never be repeated existentially. p.5 The Photograph is never anything but […]


Olin, Margaret., ‘Touching Photographs: Roland Barthes’s “Mistaken” Identification’ in Photography Degree Zero: Reflections on Roland Barthes’s Camera Lucida ed. by Geoffrey Batchen (London: MIT, 2009) 75-89 p.75 A photograph enjoys an unusually close relationship to its referent, acording to a widespread theory about the nature of photography. As this theory would have it, the key […]


Hirsch, Marianne., Family Frames: Photography, Narrative and Postmemory (London: Harvard University Press, 1997) p.2 Barthes cannot show us the photograph because we stand outside the familial network of looks and thus cannot see the picture in the way that Barthes must. To us it would be just another generic family photograph. The picture of his […]


“Will Image Move Us Still” by Kevin Robins, pp.29-50. The Photographic Image in Digital Culture, edited by Martin Lister, London, Routledge, 1995. p.30 The fact that technological development is seen as some kind of transcendent and autonomous force – rather than what it really is, that is to say embedded in a whole array of […]


“Photographic Anamnesia: The Past in the Present” Mette Sandbye in Symbolic Imprints: Essays on Photography and Visual Culture, edited by Lars Kiel Bertelson, Rune Gade, and Mette Sandbye, Aaphus University, Oxford, 1999. p.181 [Sandbye disagrees with Sontag’s view that ‘To possess the world in the form of images is, precisely,  to re-experience the unreality and remoteness […]



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