Archive for the ‘Time and photography’ Category

McInnes, Marnie. ‘A Meditation on Poetry and Photography’ Photographies, 5:1 (March 2012) 19-32 p.19 In 26 lines describing a fairly ordinary landscape, Atwood encapsulates key paradoxes of photography as a medium; indeed, one way of reading her poem is as a compact essay on the ontology of the photographic image. As a poem, however it […]

Lomax, Yve. ‘Future Politics/The Line in the Middle’ Writing the Image (London: I.B.Tauris, 2000) 39-53 p.39 I, like many others, have searched for a point of certainty. yes, I hoped to find it and I was innocent or arrogant enough to think that I could find it, but I could never have found it. But still I […]

Judgement Day


Agamben, Giorgio. ‘Judgement Day’ Profanations translated by Jeff Fort (New York: Zone Books, 2010) 23-27 p.23 What quality fascinates and entrances me in the photographs I love? I believe it is this: for me, photography in some way captures the Last Judgement; it represents the world as it appears on the last day. the Day […]

Flusser, Vilem. ‘The Codified World’ Writings translated by Andreas Ströhl (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002) 35-41 [originally published in 1978] p.35 If we compare our situation with the one that existed before the Second World War, we are impressed by the relative colorlessness of the time before the war. Our environment is filled with color, which, day […]

Crowther, Paul. ‘The Phenomenology of Photography’ Phenomenology of the Visual Arts (even the frame) (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2009) 139-142 p.139 [cites Bourdieu] Bourdieu’s point here is that photography is more than common visual communication, but it, nevertheless, so useful in terms of its mundane social documentary functions that these functions always subvert attempts to […]



Batchen, Geoffrey. ‘Ectoplasm’ Each wild idea: writing, photography, history (Cambridge, Mass.; London: MIT, 2002 [essay originally published in 1994]) 128-144 p.129 This [current] sustained outburst of morbidity appears to stem from two related anxieties. The first is an effect of the widespread introduction of computer-driven imaging processes that allow “fake” photos to be passed off […]



Price, Mary. ‘Metaphor’ The Photograph: A Strange, Confined Space (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994) 134-149 pp.134-135 Before photography, according to Ivins [William M, Ivins, Jr.], the syntactical analysis of a picture preceded the handmade reproduction, which became a symbolic representation of its original. references for reproduction are the woodcut, etching, or lithograph that reproduce a […]

Lomax, Yve. ‘The World is a Fabulous Tale’ Writing the Image (London: I.B.Tauris, 2000) 54-65 P.55 For Plato, true philosophy did not tell tales, but poetry, on the other hand, could be accused of spinning stories foreign to truth. Plato’s line, so I’ve heard tell, is that true philosophy rises above the charms and double-dealings of rhetoric; […]

Eternal Return


Cadava, Eduardo. ‘Eternal Return’ Words of Light: Theses on the Photography of History (Chichester: Princeton University Press, 1997) 31-44 p.31 There can be no passing moment that is not already both the past and the future: the moment must be simultaneously past, present, and future in order for it to pass at all. p.32 The […]



Lomax, Yve. ‘Sometime(s)’ Writing the Image (London: I.B.Tauris, 2000) 77-87 p.78 Is there any one thing that makes photography whole? Does photography have an essence? For me it isn’t a matter of setting out to find the very interior of photography and despairing when I never reach that centre; it is not a matter of authenticating, in […]

Friday, Jonathan. ‘Stillness Becoming: Reflections on Bazin, Barthes and Photographic Stillness’ Stillness and Time: Photography and the Moving Image ed. by David Green and Joanna Lowry (Brighton: Photoforum; Photoworks, 2006) 39-54 p.39 Long before the invention of cinema, for example, photography was associated with stillness in a way that other pictorial media were not. The […]

Lomax, Yve. ‘The photograph and les temps‘ Writing the Image (London: I.B.Tauris, 2000) 121-134 p.121 A body can be anything – an animal, an idea, a body of sounds, a mountain, a liguistic corpus, a child, a photographic body of images or a wind. A body, we might say, is never separable from its relations with the […]

Campany, David. ‘Safety in Numbness: Some remarks on problems of ‘Late Photography’’ Where is the Photograph? ed. by David Green (Brighton; Kent: Photoforum; Photoworks, 2003) 123-132 p.123 [In the news report of Joel Meyerowitz’s large format photographing of the aftermath of 9/11] There was a suggestion that photography, rather than television might be the better […]

The Image


Flusser, Vilém. “Image” pp.8-13 in Towards a Philosophy of Photography (London: Reaktion Books, 2005) p.8 Images signify – mainly – something ‘out there’ in space and time that they have to make comprehensible to us as abstractions (as reductions of the four dimensions of space and time to the two surface dimensions). This specific ability […]



Berger, John. ‘Stories’ Another Way of Telling by John Berger and Jean Mohr (Cambridge: Granta Books, 1982) 277-289 p.280 A photograph is simpler than most memories, its range more limited. Yet with the invention of photography we acquired a new means of expression more closely associated with memory than any other. Both the photograph and the […]

Edwards, Elizabeth. ‘Photographs as Objects of Memory’ Material Memories ed. by Marius Kwint, Christopher Breward, Jeremy Aynsley, (Oxford: Berg, 1999) 221-236 p.222 [Edwards shall] shift the methodological focus away from content alone, arguing that it is not merely the image qua image that is the focus of contemplation, evocation and memory, but that its material […]



Bergere, John. ‘Appearances’ Another Way of Telling (New York: Vintage Books, 1982) 81- p.86 A photograph arrests the flow of time in which the event photographed once existed. All photographs are off the past, yet in them an instant of the past is arrested so that, unlike a lived past, it can never lead to […]